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danepatterson:

Drawings consisting of at least one human foot #4. 9”x12” Graphite on paper. 11 more to go in this series.

danepatterson:

Drawings consisting of at least one human foot #4. 9”x12” Graphite on paper. 11 more to go in this series.


enya-died-for-our-sins:

"Don’t Touch" @ Frieze Masters

enya-died-for-our-sins:

"Don’t Touch" @ Frieze Masters


na-vidya-na-avidya:

burntloaferings:

morbi:

zephyres:

がしゃどくろ

The Gashadokuro are such a cool folklore concept.
My favorite thing is this idea that they somehow are able to silently stalk people despite being almost 100-foot tall skeletons, because no one looks up.

Gashadokuro aka the starving skeletons are the reanimated and combined bones of the victims of starvation. Up to a hundred feet tall, they are heralded by the sound of bells ringing in the ears of their victims. They reach down from above to capture people and bit their heads off. The Gashadokuro haunt the darkness after midnight.

This is a fun one!
Mostly because of shenanigans. Or rather, some irregularities with its history.
Among “traditional” “youkai” (quotation marks on the second term, because there were times when that wasn’t the usual genus term), this one doesn’t seem to have standard kanji. To the point when a search for the kanji’s actually one of the top google suggestions for Japanese searches.
There’s a reason. Turns out this particular name (not giant skeletons in particular, as there are some famous examples), isn’t to be found in old collections of folklore. Doesn’t necessarily mean that the authors of the 1970s collections were fabricating things. But it does raise some Interesting Questions.
From the name, you’d assume that this is related to famine deaths (*gasha*, from the second character of *kiga* 飢餓 “famine” presumably, plus *sha* 者 “persons, people,” perhaps?). Yet the 1970s is already growing distant from even the starvation of the early occupation. Why would it make a first appearance then?
I would *love* to see the field notes on this one.

na-vidya-na-avidya:

burntloaferings:

morbi:

zephyres:

がしゃどくろ

The Gashadokuro are such a cool folklore concept.

My favorite thing is this idea that they somehow are able to silently stalk people despite being almost 100-foot tall skeletons, because no one looks up.

Gashadokuro aka the starving skeletons are the reanimated and combined bones of the victims of starvation. Up to a hundred feet tall, they are heralded by the sound of bells ringing in the ears of their victims. They reach down from above to capture people and bit their heads off. The Gashadokuro haunt the darkness after midnight.

This is a fun one!

Mostly because of shenanigans. Or rather, some irregularities with its history.

Among “traditional” “youkai” (quotation marks on the second term, because there were times when that wasn’t the usual genus term), this one doesn’t seem to have standard kanji. To the point when a search for the kanji’s actually one of the top google suggestions for Japanese searches.

There’s a reason. Turns out this particular name (not giant skeletons in particular, as there are some famous examples), isn’t to be found in old collections of folklore. Doesn’t necessarily mean that the authors of the 1970s collections were fabricating things. But it does raise some Interesting Questions.

From the name, you’d assume that this is related to famine deaths (*gasha*, from the second character of *kiga* 飢餓 “famine” presumably, plus *sha* 者 “persons, people,” perhaps?). Yet the 1970s is already growing distant from even the starvation of the early occupation. Why would it make a first appearance then?

I would *love* to see the field notes on this one.


witnesstheabsurd:

SHAMSHEL
FIFTH ANGEL

witnesstheabsurd:

SHAMSHEL

FIFTH ANGEL


cuileggs:

unrad dads who think they’re rad dads who’re kind of bad dads aren’t you glad they’re not your mad dad it’s just a fad don’t make your sons sad


vaspim:

You wanna know what gets me off? What really turns me on? Writing an essay without changing the default size 11 Calibri font with no line spacing, and then changing it to size 12 Times New Roman with double spacing and seeing it grow from 3 to 5 pages. Yeah, that really gets me going.


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